GMRS J-Pole antenna




The first rule of antennas: COPPER IS KING!

copper gmrs j-pole antenna

The first metal known to be manipulated by humans was copper.  Ancient Palestinians pounded copper nuggets into tools as far back as 9,000 BC, and copper was the first metal known to be alloyed with another metal, tin, to make bronze.  In Hebrew folklore and the Book of Genesis, Lamech’s third child was Tubal Cain, who reputedly invented the forge and was the first artificer of metals, forging tools and other items from copper and bronze.

The largest copper deposits in the world are found in Michigan, and the worlds largest copper nugget ever found came from Michigan and weighed 420 tons.  Copper is one of the few metals found in natural form that can be directly used without processing.

One thing that makes copper an outstanding choice for antennas is that it is a very efficient conductor of electrical energy.  In fact, about the only common element that is more conductive than copper is silver.  With copper being twice as conductive as aluminum and six times more conductive than steel, copper makes an excellent choice as an antenna material.  The increased electrical efficiency of copper means more of your RF energy will go up and out the antenna and not be trapped, creating heat energy.  More efficient radiation also means that you can run higher power with a copper antenna than with other materials.  There are a couple of downsides with copper, though.  One is the cost.  In the last couple of years, copper has almost become a semi-precious metal and its cost continues to rise.  On a pure energy efficiency standpoint however, copper is the best material to choose for a base station or permanently mounted antenna.  Using copper for your antenna will result in more of your signal getting into the air and less RF energy being turned into heat by the internal resistance of the metal.  I make my GMRS J-Pole antennas from 1/2 inch type M copper tubing and tune each one for the middle frequency of 465.000 mHz for the GMRS bands.   Copper doesn't corrode, and after a short time exposed to the elements the antenna will turn from a bright golden color to a warm brown color.  This color change doesn't affect the performance of the antenna in any way at all.

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GMRS radio J-Pole antenna GMRS radio J-Pole antenna
GMRS radio J-Pole antenna GMRS radio J-Pole antenna GMRS radio J-Pole antenna GMRS radio J-Pole antenna
GMRS radio J-Pole antenna GMRS radio J-Pole antenna GMRS radio J-Pole antenna GMRS radio J-Pole antenna
GMRS radio J-Pole antenna GMRS radio J-Pole antenna GMRS radio J-Pole antenna GMRS radio J-Pole antenna




Houston, 1995







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